Tag Archives: African American male poets

Honoring Black Poets for Poetry Month

Honoring Black Poets for Poetry Month 

This jubilant post proudly celebrates the annual April Poetry Month by looking back at the 32nd Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry in February of 2022.

On February 19th, 2022, on Zoom, a global reading of poetry from across the globe took place from those whose ancestral heritage derived from the continent of Africa. 

The 32nd Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry is an annual poetry reading in the East Bay, formerly hosted by the West Oakland Library. Each year for the past 10 or so years we have adopted the yearly theme selected by Association of African American Life and History (ASALH, founded by Dr. Carter G. Woodson). This year the theme is African American Health and Wellness. We are dedicating this program to the late Al Young, CA Poet Laureate and bell hooks, womanist, scholar, writer, activist.

The following link is to the Zoom recording of the event: https://www.facebook.com/641666915/videos/531262678165878/

32nd Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry

African American Health and Wellness

On February 19, 2022, from 10-12 noon PST held virtually on Zoom, will be the 32nd Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry.

This year’s 2022 theme from Dr. Carter G Woodson’s Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is “African American Health and Wellness.” However, all themes are welcome.

This year program is dedicated to the memories of Al Young and bell hooks.

The event will feature Baba Kalamu ya Salaam and perhaps you. Contact the event host in advance if you are coming and you are a poet of African American descent.

There will be open mic sprinkled in with featured poets.

Last year, was the first time the Celebration went virtual and it went really well. It was a great program honoring two poets who made their transitions late 2020 and early 2021: Adam David Miller (AD Miller) and QR Hand.

This year’s event will start and end
earlier. We are looking once again for in-kind sponsors who can get the word out.

Please register in advance for Sat., Feb. 19, 2022, 10-12 noon PT:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcpdu6rrzwjE9JQfvgUECVkX_rDVMtqVEpw

We will have a virtual rehearsal-check-in, Thursday, Feb. 17, 2022 12-1 p.m. PT Please register in advance:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87815114641?pwd=V045N1pmZW1DMjV6dm81YTV6aEdUdz09

If you cannot make the rehearsal, 1/17, let me know. I will also open the room 2/19 at 9 AM PT

Here is a link to the 31st Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry and here is a link to the 30th Annual Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry blog entry.

We want to thank Nia McAllister at MoAD-SF for her help with editing the video last year and posting it to the museum
site.

We also want to thank all of our in-kind sponsors for their help getting the word out and to the poets much love.

Peace and Blessings,
Ms. Wanda Sabir
Founder, Host
(510) 255-5579 message
wolaacp@gmail.com

NFN

Transformed
My matter
Into bits
Now I’m a Non-fungible Negro

#Poleaxed
The haters
With this trick
So I’m a damned digital hero

I’m coming to
Your Twitter feed
If you cut me
I won’t bleed

I bring this world
What it needs
I’m Cyber
Johnny Appleseed

By Dericki Johnson

DeRicki Johnson (@derickijohnson) / Twitter
https://www.twitter.com/derickijohnson

DeRicki Johnson (@derickijohnson) • Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/derickijohnson/

Minster King X’s “Peace of Pye,” featuring American Prisoner Artist C-Note

On March 10th of 2020, Minster King X released on YouTube, the six minute music video Peace of Pye. It was produced by Kim Pollak, Editor-in-chief of the California Prison Focus, with commentary by American prisoner artist C-Note. All three are doing work as delegates for the Principal Thinkers of the 2011 and 2013 California Prison Hunger Strikes. These strikes, along with the Principal Thinkers’, Agreement to End All Hostilities throughout the California prison system and jails, is what ended the California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation’s (CDCR), more-than-a-century use of long-term solitary confinement.

Peace of Pye as the working title, is a play on the work Minister King X was doing behind the prison walls. King in the mid-90s was an Oakland-based rapper known as Pyeface, and was registered with Highside Records. However, his rap career abruptly came to an end when he was sentenced to do time in the Feds and in California. He spent a total of 24 years behind bars, six years in Federal prisons, and 18 in California maximum security prisons. His principal conflict with California prison officials was his peaceful organizing around prison conditions. Pyeface, as he was predominantly known throughout the prison systems, was also affectionately nicknamed The George Jackson of Rapp. Peace of Pye is a provocative work of contemporary Hip Hop that has been seeping out from behind the prison walls. It is a mix of still life photos and video. In the first half, King narrates us through his journey in the prison system and the psychological warfare tactics the system uses; to the returning citizen who takes the lessons learned inside, and uses them to bring positive change to his community and to society writ large; all the while, never forgetting to honor the dignified individuals he meet inside. The second half concludes with a musical track and lyrics that will have listeners up on their feet, shaking their hips, screaming, “Vote’em Out! Vote’em Out!…..Vote’em Out! Vote’em Out!” It is a part of his strategy of using voter restoration and the power of art as a means to bring the death nails to mass incarceration.

[Editor’s Note]: Min. King X recently returned home after 18 years in California Maximum Security Prisons. He is a Hip Hop artist, writer, actor, director, founder of prison-based Anti-Hostility Group K.A.G.E. Universal and Co-Director of California Prison Focus, seeking support to grow a movement through education, culture and arts.

He is seeking support for his K.A.G.E. to the Stage programs including the production of a revolutionary theater production. To support his efforts, send tax deductible donations designated to K.A.G.E. Theater Productions to California Prison Focus, 4408 Market St., Ste. A, Oakland, CA 94608 or on-line at prisons.org.

For more information on Min. King X or K.A.G.E. Universal, visit http://www.prisons.org/speakers/37 or follow Min. King X on Facebook or Instragram: @minkingwilliam]

For more on Donald “C-Note” Hooker visit: https://darealprisonart.wordpress.com/2016/12/01/featured-artist-donald-c-note-hooker/amp/

To follow what’s happening in California prisons directly from those who are most impacted, subscribe to Prison Focus newspaper at prisons.org or follow California Prison Focus. Instagram: @caprisonfocus Facebook: @californiaprisonfocus Twitter: @CAprisonfocus Video Produced by Kim Pollak of California Prison Focus.

Oakland’s Free Poetry Fest

February is Black History Month, and the 29th Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry at the Oakland Public Library’s West Oakland Branch.

This year’s theme, “Black Migration,” coincides with the 2019 theme of Dr. Carter G. Woodson’s Association for the Study of African American Life and History (Established in 1915). ASLAH’s 2019 theme “Black Migration,” emphasizes the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities. While inclusive of earlier centuries, this theme focuses especially on the twentieth century through today. Beginning in the early decades of the twentieth century, African American migration patterns included relocation from southern farms to southern cities; from the South to the Northeast, Midwest, and West; from the Caribbean to U.S. cities, as well as to migrant labor farms; and the emigration of noted African Americans to Africa, and cities in Europe, such as Paris and London after the end of World War I and II. Such migrations resulted in a more diverse and stratified interracial and intra-racial urban population, amidst a changing social milieu, such as the rise of the Garvey movement in New York, Detroit, and New Orleans; the emergence of both Black industrial workers and Black entrepreneurs; the growing number and variety of urban churches and new religions; new music forms like ragtime, blues, and jazz, white backlash as in the Red Summer of 1919; the blossoming of visual and literary arts, as in New York, Washington DC, Chicago, and Paris in the 1910s and 1920s. The theme “Black Migration” equally lends itself to the exploration of the century’s later decades from spatial and social perspectives, with attention to “new” African Americans because of the burgeoning African and Caribbean population in the US; Northern African Americans returning to the South; racial suburbanization; inner-city hyperghettoization; health and environment; civil rights and protest activism; electoral politics; mass incarceration; and dynamic cultural production.

The event is free to all, and while featured presenters were selected in mid-January, there will be an open mic for those interested in participating. Artwork displayed by local artists always adds an important, interesting and colorful element to the celebration.

In the 29-years since the events inception, many poets have graced it’s stage. Participants have ranged in ages from 8 to 80, some now adults and in college, others, now parents with children. Music, dance, and costumes have enhanced past performances as each participant shares her or his unique style, including poets performing in ensemble. Published writers, award-winning authors, and brand new poets reading their work in public for the first time have graced the stage. Oftentimes, the most moving recitals, were from poets who had never recited their work in public

before. If anyone has photos or footage from the past 29-years, please contact event founder Ms. Wanda Sabir at info@wandaspicks.com or leave a message for Ms. Sabir at (510) 255–5579. She would love to have the opportunity to make copies of your material.

The event, Saturday, February 2nd, 2019, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Oakland Public Library, West Oakland Branch’s Multi-Purpose Room is free to all and includes refreshments donated by many local vendors. Besides poetry, event planners would love to incorporate anyone who wants to volunteer, such as help with refreshments, the setting up of chairs, and any other pre or post behind-the-scenes work. If someone from the community knows a TV station that would be interested in broadcasting the event, event planners would be most interested in making this a reality. Also YouTubers, and other social media influencers, are most welcomed to share this event on their platform.

Event: 29th Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry

Date: Saturday, February 2, 2019

Time: 1pm-4pm

Location: Oakland Public Library, West Oakland Branch, Multi-Purpose Room

Contact: Oakland Public Library, West Oakland Branch; 1801 Adeline Street, Oakland, CA 94607 (510) 238–7352; Ms. Wanda Sabir info@wandaspicks.com or (510) 255–5579

[Editor’s Note]:

The Celebration of African American Poets and Their Poetry is the brainchild of Bay Area community activist, Wanda Ali Batin Sabir. Ms. Wanda Sabir holds a BA in Humanistic Studies from Holy Names College, and a MA in Writing from the University of San Francisco. Professor Sabir has taught English at various Bay Area colleges and has developed college-level English curriculum for multi-tiered Educational Systems both public and private throughout the Bay Area. She has been the art editor at the San Francisco Bay View for over 20 years, and a freelance journalist for theatre, music, dance, visual arts, as well as giving literary reviews both local and national. She can be heard on her radio show Wanda’s Picks http://wandaspicks.com/radio/ and her awards and activism are far too lengthy to be communicated in a single article.

ME

I don’t claim no sect
We don’t do that round here
My wife and God the only things I fear.
My shoes; nigga you couldn’t take two steps,
Check a ghetto near you, they know my rep.
Been in a lot of major cities, done did a lot of time
Charge it to the game, I lived a life of crime.
Never been a rat I’m a stand up guy.
As for that other nigga he was dropping them dimes.
Took my shyt on the chin cause I’m truly a soldier
No regrets, I’m a man; thug it out til it’s over.
Three hots and a cot thats the sum of my existence
Nothing to it but to do it;
Ain’t no need in bitching.
They say you only do two days
Your first and your last,
Well you can tell whoever said that they can kiss my ass.
I did errday, a nigga wasn’t cut no slack,
Prosecuted and penalized when I went on the attack.
Didn’t ask for no breaks cause wasn’t none being given,
Only goal I had was to continue living.
Surrounded by dope fiends, crazy folks and even a few killers,
Chomo’s & homo’s and of course the squealers.
Year after year this was my fate,
Engulfed in a world misery and hate.
You ask does crime pay and I say hell yeah!
The niggaz playing the game is all you have to fear.

 

by  microgod

THE REALEST NIGGA

This is a step away from the norm,
Not just your everyday poem.
This is the tale of one guy
Who really was “about that life!”
Im talking cash & cars
Drugs, guns, & broads!
Anything & everybody had a price tag,
The money came in by the garbage bag!

But what about the other side of the game?
The part where niggaz is dropping your name!
Telling the cops where your moms live & shyt,
Giving up the spot where you hiding them bricks!
Got caught up in a little
Couldn’t hold his own like a man.
Now, he solemnly swearing on the stand!
Suprise, suprise! Its your best friend!

Now,you headed up state to hug that cot,
Even Johnny Cochran would’ve told you to take that cop!
25 muthafuckin years go figure!
That’s what I got for being the realest nigga!

by microgod

MIST LINGERS; Intro by SOULTRAINPETRO67

Met a guy named XnysomX.
Blows chronic. Thx to him. I flunked phonics. Mastered Ebonics. Filthy attitude. Fix it…laundry list. Terror abroad. Bombing sh#t. The White mansion. On the list. Obama included. Housenigga. Clueless. Nice speech tho. Bank shots. Free throws. Wall Street. Suck boy negro. Tight buttocks. Cheeser. Deadly as HIV needles. Laboratory monkey. Measles. Get your hand outta my pockets. Let me go. Open the borders welcome my ppl. Amigos. Hot sauce and burritos. Indigestion. Western classics. Rat race. Last place. Mexicans. Don’t forget the mustard Boss. Smith and Wesson. Blow your nutsack off. Population control is the mission. Race war. Short division. No remainder. Drunk. Wrong lane. LeBron James’ inverted fade. Dunk contest. No winner. XnysomX contains shyt. Who should we blame for this? Funky as a tongue depressor. Pull my middle finger. Pure methane. Mist lingers…

<<<>>>

MIST LINGERS

Cold
Blooded
As
Dry
Ice
Is

Cause
Terror
To mo’
Kids’

Than
Isis

Terrorists

Verbal
Weapons of
Mass
Destruction

Type
Spits

Apoc
Ah
Ly
Rics

My
Arsenals
Likened to
Those
On
Sci-Fi
Flix

Soul
N
X

Da

Un
Usual
Suspects

Da manic
Maniac
N
Da
Genius

Dead
Ringers.

M.A.S.H.’n
All
Siss-i-fied
“Klingers”

Felonious
Ly
HIGH

Y’all
Sum
Reg
E

Misdemeanors

Got da
Munchies

Da Beaat
Eats

Ngaz
Like

Snak
Pak
Chik’n
Fingaz

As
Da
MIST LINGERS

Like
Steam
In da
Basement
At ah
Triad
China Town
Dry cleaners

L’z
Is
Rolled —
Two
To
Perfection

Probably

Too

Thik

As
Two
Nathan’s
Beef
Wieners

NYsom
Got
Shit
Sew’d da
Fuk up
Like ah
Seamstress

Flow’s

Seamless

Walk ah
Mile
In
My
Shoes?!

Fuk ’round
N
Fracture
Ya
Femurs

Mic
Chek’d

NYsom
Wrecked

Hear
Y’all
Callin’ for
Red Cross
N
FEMA

X
Is da
Equivalent
To

11
Afta da
NINA

Bite
My
Style?!

Ya lips
Swell up
Like

Angelina

Jolie

NYsom
Spits
Til
His
Lips is
White as
Noxema

Then
Guzzle
Ah 40

Ah
Old English

8 Ball

O.E.

My
Mind State
Regulates
Wit
My
Demeanor

“Make
It
Happen!”

Is
All
I
Know —
Never
Been
Ah
Dreamer

Been gettin’
Slow
Dough

Before
Tommy
Cole
Pam
Martin
N
Gina

Was on
Prime
Time…

X
Hell.

NYsom’s

Straight
Whole
Grain

Compared to
Y’all

O’Douls
N
Zeemas

As
Da
MIST

L
I
N
G
E
R
S
by XNYSOMX

no parenting skills

I beg your pardon? Well don’t ass me to do nothin..nodda. Nathan..not no moe. A birds and the bees talk. Gone horribly wrong. According to the old ball and chain. Baby mama numba seven asked me to talk to our dark skint son. Man. Look. It’s simple. Fuck a love note. If she sucks your dick, she really likes you. Peerit? Period? When she turns 18, if she sucks mine too, marry her. She’s loyal. Devoted. Definitely a keeper. Capital Dee. Done widdit. Lil nigga talks too much tho. Wasn’t supposed to tell his mom what grown men discuss. Dude. You’re acting mighty suspect. Go buy me some generic cigarettes. With dez last two dollas. Say what? Make it right. BTW..there’s a hungry pit bull runnin’ loose in the neighbor’hood. He don’t bite tho. Trust me. Have I ever lied to yah? Love. …dad
by SOULTRAINPETRO67

VET2VET (MORTAL COMBAT); Featuring BABY JAP

Randomness…
Nevertheless
You’re not new to this.
Gifted Lyrically!!
I knew this at first glance.
I was like “DIG THAT”
WHO IS THIS¿
Googled you…on Moco.
Found out I was the one slow to know.
Where have I been?
Secret writes on the low.
Forever reading
Weeding
For Trueness
Believing..
Words flow freely
Like you’re wounded.
Bleeding.
Feeding the greedy.
Without you?
We’d be grieving.
Missing your word play
The complexity of the things you say.
Allows me to simply
Be ME!!
To reach high for the meaning of free flow.
Stand toe to toe.
Kings & Queens of Moco!
Pimps & Pushers!
Hoodrats & Hookers!
And those Nosey ass judging
Lookers!
Wowed by how
yoU
Randomly move
words around.

Babyj~_~

Oh shit!

Vet2Vet!

Full deck

Hit da deck!

Spit hard —
like My tongue’s erect.

Ghost write some joints —
for you —
N ya crew —
give y’all ah taste ah success/respect.

Mic check!

NYsom twist ngaz wigs —
like OG Bobby Johnson cornrows —
wit berettes…

Every —
Single —
Time —
He spits —
it’s Fresh —
no Clorets…

Place ya bets!

Royal flushin’ —
y’all ngaz —
into ah endless pit ah debt…

NYsom —
30@5 version ah TREACH…

Naughty By Nature —
wrote My name on her kitty kat —
wit ah#2 pencil —
eraser ready —
to erase her —
n NYsom’s on to da next.

XNYSOMX